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Web Components: What You Need to Know in 2015 Web Components are a collection of emerging web browser standards that are on a path to significantly change the way we develop UIs of web applications - a paradigm shift in web development. With polyfills already available in all modern web browsers, and full native support in Google Chrome, now is the perfect time to learn how you can benefit from using Web Components in your next project. In this article, you will learn about Web Components basics, available frameworks, Custom Elements, as well as challenges and applications associated with this new technology. After reading this article, developers will have enough background information to begin dabbling in Web Components. What are Web Components and can I use them? To a growing number of developers, the web browser is a first choice platform for building an applicati... (more)

Angular 2 Overview By @YFain | @ThingsExpo #DevOps #IoT #Microservices

This article was excerpted from the book “Angular Development With TypeScript” (see The Angular 2 framework is a re-write of popular framework AngularJS. In short, the newer version has the following advantages over AngularJS. The code is simpler to write and read It performs better  than AngularJS It’s easier to learn The application architecture is simplified as it’s component-based This article contains a high-level overview of Angular highlighting improvements comparing to AngularJS. For a more detailed architecture overview of Angular visit product documentation at Code Simplification First of all, an Angular application consists of standard ES6 modules. Typically one module is one file. There is no need to use a framework-specific syntax for loading and using modules. Just use the universal module loader SystemJS (... (more)

Implementing the Mediator Design Pattern in Angular 2 By @YFain | @CloudExpo #Cloud

In any component-based framework you’ll need to implement component communications. The main principle is that components should be loosely coupled hence reusable hence testable. The mediator design pattern allows you to arrange component communications via “the man in the middle” so a component A never communicates with the component B directly. If a component needs data, someone will provide the data via bindings to the component’s input properties. Who’s this someone?Ain’t no business of the component. If a component needs to provide some data to the external world, it’ll emit events (with the data payload). Emits to whom? Ain’t no business of the component. Let whoever needs the data listen to the events from this component. The mediator pattern is one of the ways to arrange a loosely coupled communication between components. In the following video I show an ex... (more)

Optimize Front-End Web Performance to Ensure Highly Satisfying Experiences

Today's end users demand highly satisfying and interactive web experiences, such as automatically populated search suggestions and dynamic menus. To make applications more engaging, technologies like AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) have emerged. AJAX works by dynamically displaying and allowing users to interact with presented information - think of when you enter a Google search and results are produced as you type. AJAX does this by sending data to, and retrieving data from, a server asynchronously in the background, without interfering with the display and behavior of an existing page. While AJAX can make websites and web applications seem faster and more engaging, it also results in more application logic sitting in the web browser than ever before. This produces a greater impact for browsers overall on end-user experiences, which makes it critical to meas... (more)

SYS-CON Launches WebRTC Journal

Click here to follow ▸@WebRTCSummit SYS-CON Media has launched WebRTC Journal on featuring over 160 original articles, news stories, features, and blog entries. WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communication) is an open source project supported by Google, Mozilla and Opera that aims to enable browser-to-browser applications for voice calling, video chat, and P2P file sharing without plugins. Register FREE for WebRTC Summit here ▸ WebRTC Journal ▸Home Its mission is "To enable rich, high quality, RTC applications to be developed in the browser via simple Javascript APIs and HTML5." Follow WebRTC Journal on Twitter at @WebRTCSummit. Register FREE for WebRTC Summit here ▸ WebRTC Journal ▸Home About Ulitzer is a "new-media" platform for creating, delivering, and consuming content on the Web. Anyone can create topics,... (more)

WebRTC Summit | A Practical Guide to Building WebRTC Apps

Transforming the promise of WebRTC into a reliable solution takes more than writing a few lines of JavaScript. In his session at the WebRTC Fundamentals Summit, Ben Strong, CEO & Co-founder, vLine, will dive into a range of considerations you'll need to address. What does the browser provide - and not provide? (Spoiler alert: things left to the web developer to figure out include signaling between peers, session management, UI controls, TURN, STUN, and more.) We'll also cover the design choices required as well as common client- and server-side components you'll need to build. And no practical guide to WebRTC apps would be complete without addressing the hottest topic in WebRTC: mobile. Click here to follow ▸@WebRTCSummit Register FREE for WebRTC Summit here ▸ WebRTC Journal ▸Home Speaker Bio Ben Strong is CEO & Co-founder, vLine. He heads up vLi... (more)

WebRTC Summit | The WebRTC Data Channel

Slide Deck: The WebRTC Data Channel The WebRTC Data Channel is the next big thing in browser real-time communication. In his session at WebRTC Summit, Dan Ristic, a developer evangelist for PubNub, explored the specification of what the data channel is, the potential road blocks to using it, and where to use it in production today. He also explored the future of the data channel and how it will change the browser landscape in the years to come. Click here to follow ▸@WebRTCSummit WebRTC Journal ▸Home Speaker Bio Dan Ristic is a developer evangelist for PubNub, the leading provider of real-time technologies. He is passionate about front-end engineering and looks to push the web to its limits every day. His goal is to map the future of the web and how it will change the future of the world. A Rock Star Faculty, Top Keynotes, Sessions, and Top Delegates! Cloud Expo® 201... (more)

WebRTC Summit | WebRTC Business Models: Building a Web-Based Telecom Co

What if you could re-invent the telephone company and/or OTT (over-the-top) services using WebRTC? Do you remember all of their service upgrades on top of basic phone services? Here are some of the services from telecoms of yesteryear and even Skype from a decade ago: In/Outbound minutes Phone numbers (DIDs) Vanity phone numbers Tollfree numbers Premium Rate 900 numbers Hunt group ringing Caller ID Voice messaging Three-way and conference calling Collaboration, i.e., web-ex, gotomeeting, livemeeting Basic routing menus (IVR - sales, tech support, billing) Yellow pages White pages and Unlisted numbers Directory assistance 3-Way Calling (party lines) Multiple lines (personal & business) Emergency breakthroughs Least cost routing Call forwarding Call waiting In his session at WebRTC Summit, Chris Matthieu, founder of Twelephone, will walk you through each of these servi... (more)

Node.js and io.js Monitoring | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Microservices

Node.js and io.js Monitoring Support By Stefan Thies Node.js and io.js are increasingly being used to run JavaScript on the server side for many types of applications, such as websites, real-time messaging and controllers for small devices with limited resources. For DevOps it is crucial to monitor the whole application stack and Node.js is rapidly becoming an important part of the stack in many organizations. Sematext has historically had a strong support for monitoring big data applications such as Elastic (aka Elasticsearch), Cassandra, Solr, Spark, Hadoop, and HBase, as well as more traditional databases, web servers like Nginx, Nginx Plus and Apache, Java applications, cache servers like Redis and Memcached, messaging middleware like everyone's darling Kafka, etc.  With such rapid adoption of Node.js and now io.js, we'd be remiss not to add performance monitor... (more)

Angular and TypeScript | @ThingsExpo @YFain #IoT #Angular #TypeScript

Angular, TypeScript, SystemJS, and Browser Cache I was writing a small app in Angular 2 in TypeScript with the on-the-fly transpiling by SystemJS. I needed to implement a router that would switch between the Home and ProductDetail views in a single page app. The root component had two links and was supposed to render either Home or ProductDetail components depending on which link the user clicks. Angular 2 offers a pretty elegant syntax for this: Configure the router to map the component to a URL, and use property binding in the form of [router-link]. Nice and easy, isn't it? Then I created a HomeComponent to render the text ‘Home Component' , copy-pasted the code into ProductDetailComponent and started the app in the browser. My app uses the on-the-fly TypeScript to JavaScript compilation offered by the module loader SystemJS. Running the app properly rendered the ... (more)

Beyond the Box: Redis Transaction Correlation for Node.js By @PHolditch | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps

Beyond the Box: Redis Transaction Correlation for Node.js By Peter Holditch Looking at your nodes The AppDynamics Pro product has boasted an agent for instrumenting Node.js application components for several releases now, which is providing many customers with end to end transaction visibility across their applications incorporating Node.js tiers, as well as - uniquely - method level drill-down into the javascript code itself. In common with the other AppDynamics application agents, the Node.js agent recognises the arrival of http traffic as starting a transaction and also auto-detects many common exit points (places where the code makes requests of downstream systems) out of the box, including outbound http calls, queries on various databases and accesses to the memcached and redis caches. As caches go, however, redis is a slightly unusual beast in that in addition ... (more)