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JavaScript Authors: Sematext Blog, Klaus Enzenhofer, Mehdi Daoudi, Yakov Fain, AppDynamics Blog

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Am I Still a Java Developer? By @YFain | @ThingsExpo [#IoT]

Am I still a Java developer after 17 years of using this language? I certainly am.

This morning I got the following email from a Java developer: “It seems you are doing less Java and more web development every year.” This got me thinking, and I decided to write this blog.

Am I still a Java developer after 17 years of using this language? I certainly am. But in today’s world using just one programming language is almost impossible unless you’re willing to limit yourself to the server-side development. I’m not saying this is bad – it’s a huge field for never ending self-education and research. Even from the career perspective becoming an expert in a specific Java field can put bread and butter on your table for years to come. For example, Java experts specializing in performance tuning can charge several times more than a typical Java developer. Some people become experts in security or concurrent programming, which allows them to eat an omelet with truffles for breakfast daily.

But 95% of Java developers are doing more or less routine work, and learning other languages and tools can bring some excitement in their lives and make them more competitive in the job market.

While Java is the server-side king, HTML/JavaScript/CSS (a.k.a. HTML5) rule on the client. You can use HTML5 for creating a cross-platform UI for desktop and mobile applications. People use a variety of languages and frameworks to develop Web applications that we use daily. If you already know Java, why not come out of the closet and explore the huge and ever growing HTML5 world?

Traditionally many Java developers look down on JavaScript developers with a false assumption that real development is happening only in Java. I can reveal a secret: this is wrong. JavaScript is as close to the Web what as C language is to the hardware. Just look at this long list of compilers from different languages that generate JavaScript. In our company we use Google Dart as a way to produce JavaScript. Next year we’re planning to switch to programming in the new version of JavaScript (EcmaScript 6 spec will be finalized this summer).

Lots of popular IDEs offer great support for developing and debugging JavaScript. Every Web browser comes with a developer tool allows you to debug JavaScript and monitor everything that goes over the wire during the runtime. The tooling of a modern JavaScript developer has everything that Java developers are accustomed too:

node.js – JS framework plus a runtime for all development tools listed below
npm – node package manager used for installing and managing development tools
bower – package manager for the application dependencies
grunt – a build automation tool
yeoman – a scaffolding tool for generating the initial structure of an application for various frameworks

I teach JavaScript classes for Java developers several times a year. A typical feedback is “I thought JavaScript is a toy, but it’s a serious programming ecosystem worth learning and mastering”. And this is what I do while remaining a Java developer.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Yakov Fain

Yakov Fain is a Java Champion and a co-founder of the IT consultancy Farata Systems and the product company SuranceBay. He wrote a thousand blogs (http://yakovfain.com) and several books about software development. Yakov authored and co-authored such books as "Angular 2 Development with TypeScript", "Java 24-Hour Trainer", and "Enterprise Web Development". His Twitter tag is @yfain